Swimming

Most popular swimming styles

Front crawl

without comments

The front crawl is a classic swimming stroke and is usually one of the first learned when you take swimming lessons. The front crawl is also known as freestyle swimming, and is the fastest of all the swimming strokes, according to the Swim City website. The front crawl is a basic swimming stroke, but it still requires a good deal of timing, coordination and technique for it to be effective.?The initial position for the front crawl is on the breast, with both arms stretched out in front and both legs extended to the back. Then while one arm is pulling/pushing, the other arm is recovering. The arm strokes provide most of the forward movement, while the leg kicking in a flutter movement only provides some.

The swimming position on the chest allows good flexibility of the arm in the water, as compared to the backstroke, where the hands cannot be moved easily along the back of the spine. The above-water recovery reduces drag, compared to the underwater recovery of breaststroke. The alternating arm stroke also allows some rolling movement of the body for an easier recovery compared to, for example,butterfly. Finally, the alternating arm stroke makes for a relatively constant speed throughout the cycle.

Written by juice38

January 12th, 2015 at 11:06 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Basics of Swimming

without comments

Swimming takes a little coordination. You need to move your legs and arms in tandem, as well as time your breathing and swimming strokes for maximum efficiency. Swimming skills also include diving into the water to get a good, smooth start on your stroke. Once you feel confident moving around in the water, you can start learning basic swimming strokes such as breast stroke.

Breathing

An often overlooked basic skill in swimming is the ability to time your breaths. If you’re not comfortable breathing while swimming, you’ll struggle to make streamlined, coordinated movements. The basic idea involves breathing out through both nose and mouth when your head is underwater, then lift your head to the side, taking a full breath before plunging your face back down under the surface. experts?suggests practicing this motion when holding onto the side of the pool with your arms outstretched.

Gliding

Gliding through the water is a basic skill to master before you even consider kicking and paddling, according to swimming?experts, speaking to “The Guardian.” Gliding helps you to get used to the sensation of moving through the water headfirst. Try gently pushing off the side wall of the pool with your arms stretched out in front of your head. Keep your head face-down in the water and glide until you slow down.

Coordination

Beginner swimmers often find themselves messily chopping through the water with their limbs. That’s fine. It takes a while to get a feel for moving your limbs in time. You must also get used to moving muscles in your lower back, abdomen and hips to power you forward. Similarly, try to let your legs come up behind your body, and keep a slim, streamlined position. Over time, this reduces drag from the water and makes you a more efficient swimmer.

Breaststroke

Once you feel confident with basic swimming techniques, mastering a specific stroke is your next challenge. Breaststroke, while requiring slightly more coordination than front crawl, offers a stable, gentle stroke that’s ideal for beginners. To do the breaststroke, you need to stay straight at the water’s surface, holding your head up. Pull your arms in together with the hands almost touching. As your hands reach your chest, bend your knees and lift your feet up in a frog-like shape with the soles of your feet pointed out to each side. Push back with your legs and reach forward with your hands simultaneously. This double-propulsion should help you surge through the water.

Diving

Diving into the pool is a basic swimming skill — even if it starts out of the water. Always practice diving in a deep pool with a lifeguard on duty. When you begin, diving may only involve putting your hands together above your head and gently curling your body forward toward the water until you fall in, headfirst. As you progress, try jumping slightly and straightening your legs behind you as you dive to enter the water smoothly.

Written by juice38

January 12th, 2015 at 11:06 am

Posted in Uncategorized

History of Swimming

without comments

The history of swimming is a long one, precisely it can be traced back to the prehistoric times. The Bible, as well as the Iliad and the Odyssey all contain references to the sport of swimming. However, these sources date back nearly 3,000 years. Egyptian clay seals from 4000 B.C. also depict four swimmers doing the crawl stroke. Ancient Egyptian, Grecian and Roman palaces were often equipped with swimming pools or baths. Even drawings discovered in the Kebir desert are linked to this time period and show people moving through water. According to the historians, swimming was also often used in the battle. The Greeks were often regarded as solid swimmers.

The turning point in the history of swimming is when schools accepted swimming as a natural part of any life education. Thus, they began to teach swimming in schools not just as a life safety course but as an extracurricular activity. However, swimming competitions began to arise around the mid 1800.

Written by juice38

January 12th, 2015 at 11:05 am

Posted in Uncategorized